Tag Archives: Good News Monday

Good News Monday: Encouraging Data

Worth a look:  This CNN report on data coming out of China.

Researchers analyzed how severe COVID-19 was for those who were diagnosed. The good news: more than 80% experienced only mild symptoms.  Click the link for the full report.

aromatherapy aromatic bath bath towels

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Good News Monday: Tales from the Dark Side

They say laughter is the best medicine. (And possibly our only one until we get a reliable vaccine.) Luckily, this pandemic has some upsides. Let’s call them “coronadvantages”:

  1. Crime deterrent:  Only a fool would break into a house without knowing if its inhabitants were infected. Plus, they’re probably home
  2. Ivanka’s shoes (made in China) might finally go out of business
  3. You now have the perfect excuse to avoid just about anything
  4. West Coasters have something to take our minds off worrying about The Big One
  5. There’s no shame in being a hypochodriac
  6. Terrorists may think twice:  No large gatherings = no large targets
  7. Your neighbors will stop hosting loud parties
  8. Working in pajamas
  9. Alcohol kills germs; ergo, vodka surely has medicinal properties
  10. A new appreciation for canned goods
  11. It’s far less likely your significant other will cheat on you

not-hear-2687975_640

Good News Monday: Stemming the Tide

Amid concerns about the spread of COVID-19, here’s a practical and uplifting guide to managing our anxieties.

As the author writes in today’s New York Times, the good news is that “even in the face of fear, we do have the capacity to act in ways that would help limit contagion during an epidemic.  (If link doesn’t work, here is the article.)

(NY Times)

Are you fearful about catching the coronavirus? Are you anxious about whether you’re properly prepared for its arrival? You’re in good company.

In the past few days, I’ve had more than a few patients call or email to ask me to double or even triple the dosage of their prescription antidepressant or anti-anxiety medication so that they could have a bigger supply on hand “just in case.”

Throughout the country, people are stockpiling food in anticipation of a shortage or a quarantine. Supplies of Purell hand sanitizer flew off the shelves in local pharmacies and are now hard to find or even unavailable online.

I understand the impulse to secure one’s safety in the face of a threat. But the fact is that if I increase the supply of medication for my patients, I could well deprive other patients of needed medication, so I reluctantly declined those requests.

As a psychiatrist, I frequently tell my patients that their anxieties and fears are out of proportion to reality, something that is often true and comforting for them to realize. But when the object of fear is a looming pandemic, all bets are off.

In this case, there is reason for alarm. The coronavirus is an uncertain and unpredictable danger. This really grabs our attention, because we have been hard-wired by evolution to respond aggressively to new threats. After all, it’s safer to overact to the unknown than to do too little.

Unfortunately, that means we tend to overestimate the risk of novel dangers. I can cite you statistics until I am blue in the face demonstrating that your risk of dying from the coronavirus is minuscule compared with your risk of dying from everyday threats, but I doubt you’ll be reassured. For example, 169,000 Americans died by accident and 648,000 died of heart disease in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As of Sunday morning 19 Americans had died from the coronavirus.

The reason this probably doesn’t make you feel better is simple: Just as we tend to assume the worst about novel threats — the safest, if not the most statistically justifiable, strategy — we tend to underestimate the danger of familiar risks because we are habituated to them. We are not very rational when it comes to assessing risk.

The good news is that even in the face of fear, we do have the capacity to act in ways that would help limit contagion during an epidemic. Specifically, we can behave altruistically, which benefits everyone.

For example, research shows that when people are told that it is possible — but not certain — that going to work while sick would infect a co-worker, people are less willing to stay home than when they are reminded of the certainty that going to work sick would expose vulnerable co-workers to a serious chance of illness. Stressing the certainty of risk, in other words, more effectively motivates altruism than stressing the possibility of harm.

The lesson for the real world is that health officials should be explicit in telling the public that selfish responses to an epidemic, such as going to work while sick or failing to wash your hands, threaten the health of the community.

There are other ways to encourage selfless behavior. For example, another study examined the neural activity of people while they played a game in which they made either generous or selfish choices to award or withhold money. The researchers found that when subjects made selfish decisions, the brain’s reward center was activated, whereas when they made generous decisions, a region of the brain implicated in empathy lit up. This suggests that people are more likely to be altruistic if they are primed to think of others and to imagine how their behavior might benefit them.

There is no question that we can all be encouraged to act in the interest of our fellow humans during perilous times. Specifically, public figures need to convey loudly and clearly that we should not go to work or travel when we’re sick and that we should not hoard food and medical supplies beyond our current need — not just give us health statistics or advise about how to wash our hands.

But that will require morally authoritative leaders who can inspire the better angels of our nature by reminding us that we are all in this epidemic together.

Richard A. Friedman is a professor of clinical psychiatry and the director of the psychopharmacology clinic at the Weill Cornell Medical College, and a contributing opinion writer. 

Good News Monday: Rotten Luck

Garbage: it’s not just for landfills anymore! A company in New York City has created an all-purpose cleaner made from 97% food waste plus 3% sustainably sourced natural fragrance. Lab tests indicate that it’s 99% effective at cleaning tough dirt from multiple surfaces.

Rather than adding water — which accounts for as much as 90% in most household cleaners — all the liquid in this product is directly derived from the recycled food waste.

And instead of a plastic spray bottle that might or might not get recycled, the product comes in a refillable aluminum bottle.

How’s that for cleaning up a mess?

woman standing holding chopping board

Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels.com

 

Good News Monday: Helping Nurses Help Others

Nurses become nurses to help people. But they can spend up to 30% of their time on unsatisfying tasks that don’t involve seeing patients, such as delivering lab samples and gathering supplies.

Now, a robot named Moxi proposes to change that.  Designed to be socially intelligent,  Moxi debuted at Texas hospitals in September 2018. The robot features an expressive face with an arm, hand, and four wheeled base, and can use its hand to pick up medical supplies and deliver them to nurses or doctors; remove bags of soiled linen; and bring samples to on-site labs. This helps hospitals manage their workflow and frees up more staff time for patient care.

A.I. programming even allows Moxi to learn from human teachers. Someone, please teach it to cook appetizing hospital meals!

Meet Moxi: Our Socially Intelligent Robot Supporting Healthcare Teams

Good News Monday: Calling Them Out

As a proud —  dare I say “defiant” — owner of an older iPhone,  I was pleased to read that Apple’s rapacious strategy of planned obsolescence has been noted.

They were fined 25 million euros (£21m, $27m) for deliberately slowing down older iPhone models.  France’s competition and fraud watchdog DGCCRF imposed the fine, saying that consumers were not warned.  I’m hoping other countries follow suit.

To a company that size, I’m sure this is the equivalent of a tiny flea bite. But it does indicate that if you’ve noticed your older model is slowing down for no apparent reason, you’re not going crazy.

Which is always good to know.

justitia-2597016_640