Tag Archives: endangered

Good News Monday: Plastic Fantastic

These amazing artworks, created from the tons of plastic that wash up on local beaches, are exhibited at the Oregon Zoo, The Smithsonian, and other locations to call attention to pollution and its effect on marine life. I imagine the schedule is changing due to coronavirus, but this is something I can’t wait to see!

Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea

What Is Washed Ashore?

Roughly 300 million pounds of plastic is produced globally every year—but less than 10 percent is recycled. As a result, millions of pounds of plastic end up in our oceans.

Washed Ashore takes on the global marine debris crisis by turning plastic waste into beautiful, thought-provoking works of art. With the aim to educate viewers on the state of plastic pollution in our oceans, Washed Ashore features larger-than-life sea creatures made entirely of discarded, washed-up plastic waste.

Washed Ashore founder and director Angela Haseltine Pozzi began the project in 2010, collecting accumulated plastic along the Oregon coast. With the help of a small staff and thousands of volunteers, Pozzi has since processed around 18 tons of plastic and transformed it into powerful art with an important message.

Washed Ashore will be on display at the Oregon Zoo beginning in late January. Come view these spectacular sea creatures for yourself, and discover the reality of the “deadliest ocean predator”—plastic pollution.

Reducing plastic pollution

The rise of plastic pollution has created a global plastic waste crisis, and our oceans are feeling the effects. Plastic pollution is a threat that continues to grow, and impacts the health of both marine and land-based wildlife, as well as our ecosystems and humans. The Oregon Zoo believes that reducing sources of plastic pollution is an essential aspect of protecting the health of both wildlife and people, and the ecosystems we all depend on.

Reducing plastic pollution is only achievable through a combined effort on the part of consumers, business and governments. To learn more about what the Oregon Zoo and the city of Portland have done to reduce plastic waste and consumption, and see actions that you can take to help, click here.

 

Good News Monday: Hello, Bison!

Now there’s more space for America’s national mammal to be at home on the range. (No, not buffalo, as the song would have it*: buffalo are indigenous to South Asia and Africa, whereas bison are found in North America and parts of Europe. 

In case you’re wondering what the difference is  (of course you were), bison sport shaggy beards and buffalo don’t.

The World Wildlife Fund reports that bison in Badlands National Park now have an additional 22,553 acres in which to roam. In 2017, over 2,500 donors to WWF and partner organizations raised nearly $750,000 to build 43 miles of a new fence that extends bison habitat in the park to 80,193 acres.

This October, the WWF released bison into the new area—the first time they’ve set hoof on this land since 1877.

photo of bison on grass field

Photo by Chait Goli on Pexels.com

*Let’s be honest,”Give me a home where the bison roam” doesn’t exactly flow.

Good News Monday: Polar Bear Patrol

No, the bears aren’t on patrol… although that would be something to see! Picture a group of polar bears armed with walkie-talkies, alerting each other to salmon sightings, thin ice, and the nearest watering hole (aka, cool bar).

Nope, this is actually something serious. As summer ice continues to shrink due to climate change, polar bears are staying on land for longer periods of time.  This is dangerous to both humans and the animals who are killed in self-defense.

In Wales, Alaska, a patrol started in 2016 actively protects both bears and people using deterrents such as noisemakers, better lighting, and warning plans when bears enter communities.  The WWF is actively  helping other Alaskan villages launch similar programs.

nature couple love heart

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Good News Monday: More Buzz About Endangered Bees

Have you ever heard of National Pollinators Week? Neither had I.  Apparently, it’s in June, and after this year’s meeting, the California Fish and Game Commission voted to begin the process of classifying four species of native bumble bees as endangered.

Why does this matter? Wild bees pollinate 80% of crops on our planet, and one out of every three bites of food we eat results from pollination. With California leading the way, it’s hoped that more states will join to protect these fuzzy little creatures.

Two of the four species are named Crotch’s and Suckley.  Sounds like a degenerate law firm. Or a strip club.

bee bumblebee insect macro

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

Good News Monday: A Baby Boomlet For An Endangered Species

Here’s a whale of a story complete with cute photos.

One of the rarest species in the world, the North Atlantic right whale, is making waves with recent sightings of three new mother and calf pairs in Cape Cod Bay.

All together now: “Awwwww!”

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Good News Monday: Oryx and Eagles and Bears, Oh My!

Happy Labor Day, US friends!

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Today’s heartening item is that several animal populations are finally on the upswing, including

  • Bald Eagle
  • Arabian Oryx
  • Gray Wolf
  • Northern Elephant Seal
  • Brown Bear
  • Giant Panda
  • Humpback Whale

Unfortunately, no politicians have been added to the endangered species list.