Tag Archives: working from home

Today’s COVID-19 Practical Tip: Avoiding Tech Neck

“Tech Neck” is a term given to headaches and spasms you can get from too much hunching. While working from home at this time, it is crucial for proper ergonomics to be taken seriously and avoid low back and neck issues.

Here are some tips from my chiropractor.

GET OFF THE COUCH
Although it might be tempting, working from your sofa is one of the worst things you can do for your back. Sitting or lounging on your couch for extended periods of time causes your lower back to curve inward too much, resulting in low back pain.

Maintain spine health by going for a chair or a barstool during working hours & use a table top. If possible make your own standing desk.

USE A ROLLED UP TOWEL TO SUPPORT YOUR BACK WHILE SITTING

COMPUTER SCREEN SHOULD BE AT EYE LEVEL
Whether sitting or standing, the middle of your screen should be in line with your eyes while you’re working, not below. Your computer/laptop should be elevated approximately 6 to 12 inches above your desk. Use books or boxes to get to that sweet spot. This will avoid neck & shoulder strain.

Avoid no-no spots for your laptop: never on your lap for long periods of time, sitting on your bed, and definitely not on your coffee table.

USE A WIRELESS KEYBOARD & WIRELESS MOUSE

Using a computer keyboard and mouse requires a person to make small, exact movements with their hand, fingers and thumb, and these small muscles can become tired and overworked. This overuse can cause pain, numbness, tingling, burning, stiffness and restricted range of motion as well as shoulder pain.

Reduce these symptoms by making sure you use the mouse as close to your body as possible. You should be able to reach your computer mouse when your upper arm is close to your body and your elbow is at 90 degrees.

If your computer is elevated to the proper height, it will be hard to use the keyboard and mouse without shrugging your shoulders. A wireless keyboard & mouse are a good investment. You can easily and inexpensively buy some fun ones online.

TAKE BREAKS AND STRETCH

Set your timer for 45 minutes-1 hour intervals when working on your computer. Take a 5 minute break to change activity and body position. Do some easy stretches to save your neck and back.

PROPER NUTRITION, SLEEP, HYDRATION, CUTTING BACK ON SUGAR, AND MAINTAINING GOOD GUT HEALTH WILL HELP YOUR OVERALL IMMUNE SYSTEM!

 

Am I What I Wear?

Lately, I’ve been going through an identity crisis. A sartorial one, primarily, stemming from the question, “Who am I if I’m not working?” combined with the dread of becoming invisible with the passing years.

As a freelance writer/retired (mostly) by choice, I could spend the day in ratty sweatpants and no one would notice. But that’s just not “me”; I worked in an office for 30 years and dressing for work is a difficult habit to overcome. Plus, I’ve always loved fashion.

This particular crise du jour is also accompanied by weight loss, which would normally be cause for celebration but is in fact cause for alarm/introspection/analysis as I have to decide: Since I have to buy new clothes that fit, WHAT should they be?

The delightful blogger Lady Sarah offers a brilliant suggestion: Create a pie chart for how you actually spend your time so that you can buy accordingly. Instead of shopping for a fantasy life, I’m taking this a step further to analyze not just how I currently spend my time but how I’d like to spend it.

Categories

• At home doing chores, scrolling through online articles, contemplating working out, watching TV, contemplating cleaning, actually working out, reading, actually cleaning

• At home writing (want to project a professional image, if only to myself)

• Running errands: Stained tees are a non-starter even though the chances of bumping into someone I know — since I know virtually no one in Texas — are slim to none

• Lunch dates: All too few. Goal: expand opportunities

• Dinner dates with husband and friends: Ah, safe ground here. Need to look nice but not overly fussed over

• Opera/Symphony: Unlikely to run into anyone here either but a good excuse to dress up

• Entertaining at home: What to wear that is chic but won’t get stained while cooking?

• Travel: My sweet spot, wardrobe-wise. I’m a big-city girl at heart and enjoy being able to wear my favorite pieces without feeling overdressed. Not that anyone’s looking – but it’s all about how you see yourself, isn’t it?

• Playing with grandchildren: Not the time for a silk blouse, but surely I can do better than an old band t-shirt and leggings even if the baby is likely to spit up

• Summer hiking/walking: Anything goes, as long as it’s waterproof

• Wine tasting (a favorite summer activity): Upgraded casual, mostly dark colors in case I spill something – a real possibility around Glass #3

FullSizeRender 7All in all, what I’ve learned from this exercise is that I shouldn’t buy another leather jacket since I live in a warm climate (much as I adore them) and that I should create more opportunities that are appropriate for my favorite items rather than “dumbing down” my wardrobe to match my mostly-stay-at-home activities.

Sign me up for: adult education classes, more travel, more lunches/dinners with friends, more evenings out, volunteering at anything where you shouldn’t look like a slob, and so on.

Anyone else having an identity crisis as you change jobs, become a stay-at-home parent or approach retirement? Please share your solutions and insights with the rest of us!

Xx, Alisa